Search
Close this search box.

The Prehistoric Man Museum

Exploring Israel

The Prehistoric Man Museum is a museum that explores the prehistoric age. Located in Kibbutz Ma’ayan Baruch in the northern part of the Hula Valley, the museum showcases historical artifacts found in and around the kibbutz. The museum gives visitors a widespread view of prehistoric man’s way of life. 



So the Prehistoric Man Museum houses an extensive collection of prehistoric tools and vessels. Moreover, this includes the skeleton of a prehistoric woman buried with her dog and hand axes predating human settlement in the Hulah Valley, dating back from 780,000 – 6,000 years ago. Dating to the Natufian period (about 14,000 years ago), the skeleton of the woman and her dog is among the earliest evidence of dog domestication. 



The museum also has an Ethno-Geographic wing with an Ethnographic Collection of artifacts and tools from aboriginal groups worldwide made from natural or organic material. This collection graphically demonstrates life in former prehistoric cultures. 

History of the Prehistoric Man Museum

The Prehistoric Man Museum was founded by Amnon Assaf, who scoured the Kibbutz and the Hula Valley grounds. Assaf collected a wide variety of prehistoric artifacts ranging from a large collection of tools and weapons to skeletons. 


The Prehistoric Man Museum
In This Photo: A Skeleton From Eynan. The site was an Epipalaeolithic settlement belonging to the Natufian culture, built and settled circa 10,000–8,000 BCE. The settlement is an example of hunter-gatherer sedentism, a crucial step in the transition from foraging to farming. In fact, Eynan has one of the earliest known archaeological evidence of dog domestication.
Credit: Prehistoric Man Museum

Visiting The Museum

The museum is open every day of the week from 10:00 to 13:30. It offers guided tours and has an entry fee. Here is a link to their website. So if you’re looking for fun things to do with kids, or you are exploring the area without a doubt, I recommend visiting the Prehistoric Man Museum.

arik-about

Hi! My name is Arik, an Israeli native who dedicated his life to sharing my passion for the Holy Land with those interested in knowing more about this incredible piece of land. I’m the Chief Guide at ‘APT Private Tours in Israel’.

Did you know the Hoopoe is Israel's national bird?! For more cool info about Israel, join our ever growing community and get exclusive travel tips, and giveaways!

Bible Lands Museum

RELATED POSTS

The Italian Hospital in Jerusalem

The Italian Hospital in Jerusalem is a monument to the return of the city from a marginal city to the center of international interest.

Little Western Wall

The Little Western Wall is a Jewish religious site located in the Old City of Jerusalem The wall itself dates from the Second Temple period.

Best Museums in Tel Aviv

To truly experience a culture, you must dive into their museums to learn about their history; culture; art; and so much more. The best museums ...

Ein Gedi Botanical Garden

The Ein Gedi Botanical Gardens is a stunning destination for nature lovers and anyone seeking a peaceful and beautiful escape in the Desert.

Mikveh Israel

Mikveh Israel was founded in 1870 by Charles Netter, as an agricultural school to teach a new way of life to the future Jewish farmers.

Robinson’s Arch

Robinson's Arch, dated to the 2nd Temple Period, is a remarkable archaeological remnant! A testament to ancient engineering prowess

Hermon Stream Nature Reserve

When touring Israel, Hermon Stream Nature Reserve is a must-see destination to add to your checklist. It is a great site to visit any time!

Yaacov Agam Museum of Art

The Yaacov Agam Museum of Art is a stunning tribute to the life and work of one of Israel's most celebrated artists.

Qesem Cave

In this post, we delve into the fascinating discoveries and the significance of Qesem Cave in unraveling the mysteries of our distant past.

St. Anthony Coptic Monastery

The St. Anthony Coptic Monastery in the Old City of Jerusalem is a hidden gem of spirituality and history. Let's get to know it better!

Need help?

Skip to content