Search
Close this search box.

Jesus: Genealogy and Nativity

Exploring the Holy Land

So this post is about Jesus’ Genealogy and Nativity. Jesus was Jewish, born to Mary, wife of Joseph (Matthew 1; Luke 2). The Gospels of Matthew and Luke offer two accounts of the genealogy of Jesus. Matthew traces Jesus’ ancestry to Abraham through David. Luke traces Jesus’ ancestry through Adam to God. The lists are identical between Abraham and David but differ radically from that point. Matthew has twenty-seven generations from David to Joseph, whereas Luke has forty-two; with almost no overlap between the names on the two lists. Various theories have been put forward seeking to explain why the two genealogies are so different.

The Church of Nativity
In This Photo: The Church of Nativity in Bethlehem

More About Jesus: Genealogy and Nativity

Matthew and Luke each describe Jesus’ birth, especially that Jesus was born to a virgin named Mary in Bethlehem in fulfillment of prophecy. Luke’s account emphasizes events before the birth of Jesus and centers on Mary, while Matthew’s mostly covers those after the birth and centers on Joseph. 

Both accounts state that Jesus was born to Joseph and Mary; his betrothed, in Bethlehem, and both support the doctrine of the virgin birth of Jesus; according to which Jesus was miraculously conceived by the Holy Spirit in Mary’s womb when she was still a virgin. At the same time, there is evidence, at least in the Lukan Acts of the Apostles; that Jesus was thought to have had, like many figures in antiquity; dual paternity, since there it is stated he descended from the seed or loins of David. Joseph will give him the necessary Davidic descent by taking him as his own.

Jesus: Genealogy and Nativity in Matthew’s Gospel 

In Matthew, Joseph is troubled because Mary, his betrothed; is pregnant (Matthew 1:19–20). But in the first of Joseph’s three dreams an angel assures him not to be afraid to take Mary as his wife because her child was conceived by the Holy Spirit  In Matthew 2:1–12, wise men or Magi from the East bring gifts to the young Jesus as the King of the Jews. They find Jesus in a house in Bethlehem. Jesus is now a child and not an infant.

Matthew focuses on an event after the Luke Nativity where Jesus was an infant. In Matthew Herod the Great hears of Jesus’ birth and, wanting him killed, orders the murders of male infants in Bethlehem under the age of 2. But an angel warns Joseph in his second dream, and the family flees to Egypt—later to return and settle in Nazareth. In Luke 1:31–38, Mary learns from the angel Gabriel that she will conceive and bear a child called Jesus through the action of the Holy Spirit. 

When Mary is due to give birth; she and Joseph travel from Nazareth to Joseph’s ancestral home in Bethlehem to register in the census ordered by Caesar Augustus. While there Mary gives birth to Jesus, and as they have found no room in the inn, she places the newborn in a manger (Luke 2:1–7). An angel announces the birth of a group of shepherds, who go to Bethlehem to see Jesus and subsequently spread the news abroad (Luke 2:8–20). After the presentation of Jesus at the Temple, Joseph, Mary, and Jesus return to Nazareth.



Jesus Genealogy and Nativity: Early Life and Family and Profession 

Jesus’ childhood home is identified in the gospels of Luke and Matthew as the town of Nazareth in Galilee; where he lived with his family. Although Joseph appears in descriptions of Jesus’ childhood; no mention is made of him thereafter. His other family members—his mother, Mary, his brothers James, Joseph, Judas and Simon and his unnamed sisters—are mentioned in the gospels and other sources.

The Gospel of Mark reports that Jesus comes into conflict with his neighbors and family. Jesus’ mother and brothers come to get him (Mark 3:31–35) because people are saying that he is crazy (Mark 3:21). Jesus responds that his followers are his true family. In John, Mary follows Jesus to his crucifixion, and he expresses concern over her well-being (John 19:25–27).

Jesus is called a τέκτων (tektōn) in Mark 6:3, traditionally understood as a carpenter but it could cover makers of objects in various materials, including builders. The gospels indicate that Jesus could read, paraphrase, and debate scripture, but this does not necessarily mean that he received formal scribal training.

When Jesus is presented as a baby in the temple per Jewish Law, a man named Simeon says to Mary and Joseph that Jesus “shall stand as a sign of contradiction; while a sword will pierce your own soul. Then the secret thoughts of many will come to light” (Luke 2:28–35). Several years later, when Jesus goes missing on a visit to Jerusalem; his parents find him in the temple sitting among the teachers; listening to them and asking questions, and the people are amazed at his understanding and answers; Mary scolds Jesus for going missing, to which Jesus replies that he must “be in his father’s house” (Luke 2:41–52).



arik-about

Hi! My name is Arik, an Israeli native who dedicated his life to sharing my passion for the Holy Land with those interested in knowing more about this incredible piece of land. I’m the Chief Guide at ‘APT Private Tours in Israel’.

Did you know the Hoopoe is Israel's national bird?! For more cool info about Israel, join our ever growing community and get exclusive travel tips, and giveaways!

Simon Peter

RELATED POSTS

The Prophet Elijah & Mt. Carmel

A well-known biblical account concerning Elijah the Prophet occurred on top of Mt. Carmel. This post is all about this famous event!

Monasticism in the Holy Land

Monasticism, a tradition of disciplined and ascetic living devoted to spiritual growth, has a deep-rooted history in the Holy Land, encompassing a tapestry of religious, ...

The Incarnation of Jesus

The Incarnation of Jesus Christ is one of the most fundamental beliefs of Christianity. It is the belief that the Son of God, who existed ...

Islam

Islam, one of the world’s major religions, is a faith with a rich history, diverse traditions, and millions of followers across the globe. In this ...

Camels in the Bible

Camels in the Bible were not only a symbol of the ancient nomadic way of life but also played a pivotal role in Biblical accounts.

John the Baptist In Mark

In fact, the Gospel of Mark gives the most complete description of the adult John the Baptist. He is described as the Prophet Elijah

The Armageddon

According to the Book of Revelation in the New Testament, the Armageddon (from Hebrew: Har Megiddo) is the prophesied location of a gathering of armies ...

Catherine of Alexandria

Catherine of Alexandria is according to tradition, a Christian saint and virgin, who was martyred in the early 4th century by the emperor Maxentius.

The Báb

The Báb is one of the central figures in the Baháʼí Faith, and his teachings and influence continue to inspire Baháʼís to this day.

Mahdi

The Mahdi is a prophesied messianic figure in Islamic eschatology who is believed to appear before the end of the world.

Need help?

Skip to content