Search
Close this search box.

Tankiziyya Madrasa

Exploring Jerusalem

So, in the heart of Jerusalem’s Old City, where history, culture, and spirituality converge, lies a lesser-known but profoundly captivating architectural gem—the Tankiziyya. Moreover, this elegant structure, tucked away within the city’s labyrinthine streets, is a testament to the Mamluk era’s architectural brilliance and cultural richness.


Tankiziyya
Tankiziyya Elaborate Portal.
Credit: Ranbar at Hebrew Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

A Glimpse into Mamluk Jerusalem:

The Mamluk dynasty ruled over Jerusalem and much of the Islamic world from the 13th to the 16th century. It was a period of flourishing culture and architectural innovation. Jerusalem became a vibrant center of artistic and intellectual activity during this time, creating remarkable structures like the Tankiziyya.


Tankiziyya Interior
The Interior of the Tankiziyya.
Credit: Deror Avi, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The Tankiziyya: An Architectural Jewel:

The Tankiziyya, also known as the Tankiziyya Madrasa, is an exquisite example of Mamluk architecture in Jerusalem. It was built in 1320 CE by Tankiz al-Nasiri, the Mamluk governor of Jerusalem. This educational institution seamlessly blends aesthetic beauty with functional design, embodying the Mamluk commitment to education and spirituality.

Mamluk Architecture
Qaytbay-Dome-Egypt-Closeup
The Stone Dome From the Funerary Complex of Sultan Qaytbay. The Dome Combines Geometric and Arabesque Froms, Intertwined! All Carved Out by Hand. This is Extremely Hard.
Credit: Robert Prazeres, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Key Architectural Features:

  1. Intricate Ornamentation: The Tankiziyya is renowned for its intricate architectural details. Its facade features delicate geometric patterns, arabesques, and inscriptions in the elegant Mamluk style. These ornate embellishments serve an aesthetic purpose and carry profound religious and spiritual messages.
  2. Courtyard and Arcade: Like many Mamluk-era structures, the Tankiziyya includes a central courtyard surrounded by arched porticoes. The courtyard served as a tranquil space for students and scholars to gather for study and contemplation.
  3. Mihrab and Minbar: The prayer hall within the Tankiziyya boasts an intricately designed mihrab (prayer niche) and minbar (pulpit), showcasing the craftsmanship and attention to detail that defined Mamluk architecture.

Temple Mt.
Temple-Mount-Dome-of-the-Rock-Windows

Education and Spirituality:

The Tankiziyya was a place of architectural beauty and an educational institution where scholars gathered to study Islamic theology, law, and philosophy. It exemplified the Mamluk commitment to nurturing intellectual and spiritual growth.


The Fountain of Qaitbay
Jerusalem-Temple-Mount-Fountain-of-Qayt-Bay-1
Credit: Andrew Shiva – Wikipedia – CC BY-SA 4.0

Rediscovering the Tankiziyya:

Today, the Tankiziyya stands as a testament to the enduring legacy of Mamluk architecture in Jerusalem. Visitors to the Old City can explore this hidden gem, providing a glimpse into a bygone era of artistic excellence and cultural exchange.


Old City Jerusalem Tour
Al Aqsa - Crusader Window
Crusader Window at Al Aqsa Mosque.

As you stand within the hallowed halls of the Tankiziyya, take a moment to reflect on the convergence of history, faith, and knowledge that this magnificent structure represents. It is a reminder that Jerusalem’s architectural treasures inspire awe and admiration, bridging the past with the present and offering a profound connection to the city’s rich and diverse heritage.

arik-about

Hi! My name is Arik, an Israeli native who dedicated his life to sharing my passion for the Holy Land with those interested in knowing more about this incredible piece of land. I’m the Chief Guide at ‘APT Private Tours in Israel’.

Did you know the Hoopoe is Israel's national bird?! For more cool info about Israel, join our ever growing community and get exclusive travel tips, and giveaways!

Shiloh Excavations In The City Of David

RELATED POSTS

San Simon Monastery

San Simon Monastery stands as a quiet haven of contemplation and serenity. This hidden gem invites visitors to connect with themselves.

Etzel House

The Etzel House, located in Tel Aviv, Israel, is a historical and cultural landmark dedicated to preserving the memory of the Etzel paramilitary organization. The ...

Jerusalem Beach

Jerusalem Beach in Tel Aviv offers a unique blend of serenity and urban vibrancy that captures the essence of the city's coastal charm.

Church of Mary Magdalene

The Church of Mary Magdalene is a church located on the Mount of Olives, near the Garden of Gethsemane in Jerusalem. Click here for more!

The Austrian Hospice

The Austrian Hospice to the Holy Family is a pilgrims hostel of the Austrian Catholic Church in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Al-Aqsa Mosque

The Al-Aqsa Mosque is the third holiest site for Muslims. It's located just next to the Golden Dome on Temple Mount makes it a must-see ...

Mary’s Well

Mary's Well is reputed to be located at the site where the Angel Gabriel appeared to Mary, mother of Jesus according to Christian Orthodox.

Terra Sancta Museum

The Terra Sancta Museum is an attraction for anyone visiting Jerusalem. offers an insightful journey into the history of the Holy Land.

Zedekiah’s Cave

Zedekiah's Cave (Solomon's Quarries) is the largest artificial cave in Israel, located under the houses of the Muslim Quarter in Jerusalem.

Joshua’s Altar

Mount Ebal, near the modern city of Nablus (biblical Shechem), is a significant historical and biblical site associated with Joshua's Altar.

Need help?

Skip to content