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Ben Yehuda Street

Shopping Centers in Jerusalem

If you are visiting Jerusalem and you want to do Some Shopping. So in Ben Yehuda Street is a very good option. The street is named after the founder of Modern Hebrew, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda. Even before the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, Ben Yehuda St was already one of Jerusalem’s main streets. The street is lined with souvenir and Judaica shops and sidewalk cafes, and street musicians play there throughout the day. Nowadays it is a pedestrian mall and closed to vehicular traffic.


The street runs from the intersection of King George Street east to Zion Square and Jaffa Road. Together these three streets form the downtown triangle central business district. For one thing, Zion square is engraved in Israel’s collective memory, and I am referring to different right-wing protests over the decades. Notably the one against the late Yitzhak Rabin on the 5th of October 1995 that was assassinated one month later. In this demonstration, the heads of the right-wing participated including Benjamin Netanyahu where among other things a burial coffin, implying to Yitzhak Rabin was presented by the extremists in the crowd.

Ben Yehuda Shopping Center: Places For A Bite To Eat

Nearby there are small restaurants that are quite known to locals like Pinati on King George 13 St. The small Hummus eatery was first opened in 1975 and since then many prominent figures like Prime Ministers still come and eat there. Usually when its election time. Another option to desert in the area could be Babeitcafe.


Friendly staff and you can choose half and half toppings for your waffle. I think I did chestnut cream on one side and on the other hot fudge and strawberries. The cost was about $10 US. It’s in an area with tons of shops, outdoor seating, and busses, so lots to do before and after your waffle. Among locals, it is a known institution for the best Belgian waffle in the city. In fact, I remember myself as a student taking a bus downtown just to enjoy their delicious waffle. Located just off Ben Yehuda at 16 Shamai St behind Zion Square.

Ben Yehuda Shopping Center: Talitha Kumi Orphanage for Christian girls

So the British Anglicans and the German Lutherans founded from 1851 a number of girls’ schools in Palestine. Bishop Samuel Gobat and pastor Theodor Fliedner were leading persons. A school named “The Education House” arranged education in a rented house close to The Holy Sepulchre. The girls were taught by nurses and nuns in sewing and language. These nuns were recruited to Jerusalem and a hospital run by the same persons and organizations. They worked in the hospital daytime and taught at the school in the evening.


From 1860 the school moved to a place named “The Height of Gottfried” outside the Old City (the hill named after Gottfried of Bouillon, a crusader king of Jerusalem). From 1868 the school once again moved, now to a new impressive building called “Talitha Kumi” after Mark 5:41 there Jesus said: little girl I say to you arise! Conrad Schick was the architect of the new building located on what today is King George St. The building was taken down in 1980, but part of the “Conrad Schick” facade with a typical round clock was restored on the original place. Talitha Kumi still operates – now in Beit Jala.


In this Instagram photo, we can see what is now left of the façade of Talitha Kumi. Nothing but that was left sadly.

Frumin House: The First Sessions of the Knesset Took Place

Near Talita Kumi just a few meters away there is the famous Frumin House where the very first Knesset sessions took place. Up until the end of 1949, meetings of the Provisional State Council and the first Knesset sessions had been held in several Tel Aviv locations, including the Tel Aviv Museum of Art in Dizengoff House (today Independence Hall), and in the “Kessem” movie house located at Knesset Square. On 26 December 1949, the Knesset moved to Jerusalem, where it held its first meetings in the Jewish Agency’s impressive semi-circular building in Rehavia. After weighing several options, including the King David Hotel, the Knesset selected Froumine House for a more permanent meeting place. At the time, it was still unfinished. From 13 March 1950, meetings of the Knesset were held there.


During the Knesset sessions, King George Street in the area of Froumine House was closed for traffic; which caused great disruption to residents of the city. In addition, the location of Knesset meetings on a main street in the city center resulted in security problems. During the demonstration against the Reparations Agreement between Israel and West Germany in 1952; protesters threw stones at the building, shattering windows and penetrating the plenum chamber.


A hand grenade was also thrown into the plenum hall in 1957, which wounded Golda Meir, David Ben-Gurion, Moshe Shapira, and Moshe Carmel. Nevertheless, the “old Knesset building” was the site of a number of formative civil events, such as the passage of the Law of Return (1950). The Knesset relocation occurred during the Sixth Knesset. The last meeting of the Knesset at Froumine House was held on 11 August 1966. After recess, the session resumed on 30 August 1966, at its new campus in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Givat Ram.

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arik-about

Hi! My name is Arik Haglili, an Israeli native who decided to dedicate his life to share my knowledge about the Holy Land to those that are interested to know more about this amazing piece of land. My career as a private tour guide started at the International School For the Studying of the Holocaust and the rest is history.

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