Who built the First Temple?

Holy Land Explained

Who built the First Temple? Do We Have Archaeological Remains From The First Temple? We don’t have archaeological remains from the First Temple that was built by King Solomon. On the other hand, we have literary references to King Solomon’s Temple in the Hebrew Bible. So, we can get an idea of how the temple looked; Together with comparing it to other ancient temples in the region we can get a fairly good idea. Temple Mount physically dominated the City of David.; King Solomon’s temple was sitting on the natural high point overlooking Ancient Jerusalem.



Who built The First Temple?

The Hebrew Bible is telling us that the Temple was built by workmen from Phoenicia:

“Now King Hiram of Tyre sent his servants to Solomon when he heard that they anointed him, king, in place of his father; for Hiram had always been a friend of David”

(1 KINGS 5:1-6)

We read that a Phoenician King ruling over the city of Tyre and Phoenicia is mentioned. In order to form political alliances, we know King Solomon intermarried with foreign princesses of the neighboring kingdoms. Including a Phoenician princess.



“Solomon sent word to Hiram, saying: I intend to build a house for the name of the Lord my God; Therefore command that cedars from Lebanon be cut for me; For you know that there is no one among us who knows how to cut timber like the Sidonians”

(1 KINGS 5:1-6)

We learn King Solomon was establishing alliances with the Phoenician King, by importing materials like The Cedars of Lebanon; which were Known as a desirable material; Being the longest pieces of wood in the area to be obtained. But King Solomon also needed the craftsmen that know how to work with the timber and shape those wooden beams; So he asked for workmen from Phenicia as well.



In short, we don’t have remains of the Temple but: firstly, we know Phoenician materials were incorporated into it like Cedars; Secondly, we know foreign artists were brought to aid – All this for making the Temple.

 

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Hi! My name is Arik Haglili, an Israeli native who decided to dedicate his life to share my knowledge about the Holy Land to those that are interested to know more about this amazing piece of land. My career as a private tour guide started at the International School For the Studying of the Holocaust and the rest is history. 

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