Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
Share on telegram
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Share on digg
Share on reddit

The Decline Nabataean Kingdom

The Holy Land Explored

This post is meant describe the decline Nabataean Kingdom. So around the 7th-8th century CE, a glorious episode of the Land of Israel had come to an end. A period that lasted about 1,500 years. And It’s beginning was marked by the rise of prosperous cities that rose from the Desert’s sand. Ultimately ended with the destruction of those cities and their abandonment. These cities were built with enormous efforts and dexterity; alongside the deep acquaintance of the desert and its inherent possibilities. Later, they were destroyed by the new inhabitants of the wilderness that the Nabataean cities were alien to them.



The Decline Nabataean Kingdom: Why Did the Nabateans Leave?

Another reason for the abandonment of the Nabataean cities is that were built in such great efforts is told in ancient papyrus that was found by Harris Duncombe Colt and his archaeological team during excavations at Nitzana in 1935. During the 5th-6th century CE. At their peak, the Byzantine rulers had designated the Nabatean cities the task of being some kind of military outpost in the Limes Palestine. Which was a line of fortifications that crossed the Negev from the Mediterranean Sea to the Dead Sea. As a result, the Nabateans were exempt from paying taxes that the rest of the population was forced to pay. But after the Muslims took over they were obligated to pay heavy taxes which eventually ruined their economy.

What Does the Nessana Papyri Tell Us?

From the Nessana papyri, it is now known that the Nabateans of the Negev had to pay texas to the Muslim rulers in commodities like wheat and olive oil but in great amounts. But far more important was the production of wine that was produced by Nabateans since the 3rd century CE. And was in high demand among the soldiers of the Byzantine army. Now that the Byzantines had lost and retreated; the main consumer of that precious wine was gone. Moreover, perhaps even the possibility to export the precious wine to Europe was now not possible. So for two more generations, the Nabateans were struggling for their existence. But in the end, they had to call it quits; pack up and move on to more promising regions than the harsh Negev desert.

So I hope you enjoyed this post for more interesting posts you should check out my blog! There I have lots of different articles and suggestions on where to go or what to do in Israel.



Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
Share on telegram
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Share on digg
Share on reddit
apt-stamp-white@2x
arik-about

Hi! My name is Arik Haglili, an Israeli native who decided to dedicate his life to share my knowledge about the Holy Land to those that are interested to know more about this amazing piece of land. My career as a private tour guide started at the International School For the Studying of the Holocaust and the rest is history.

Did you know the Hoopoe is Israel's national bird?! For more cool info about Israel, join our ever growing community and get exclusive travel tips, and giveaways!

RELATED POSTS

Sarona Colony

Another great reason to come and check out Sarona Market is the Sarona Colony which is now a trendy commercial area called Sarona Tel Aviv. ...

Melisende Queen of Jerusalem

One of the famous figures during the Crusader Era was Melisende (1105 – 11 September 1161). She was Queen of Jerusalem from 1131 to 1153, ...

Acre Ancient Port

It is probable that the Acre ancient port and was first located at the mouth of the Naaman River south of Tel Acre, where the urban ...

Battle of Megiddo

This Battle of Megiddo is recorded as having taken place in 609 BCE when Pharaoh Necho II of Egypt led his army to Carchemish (northern Syria) to join with his allies; ...

The Battle of Megiddo

The Battle of Megiddo, fought 15th century BCE, was between the Egyptian forces under the command of Pharaoh Thutmose III and a large rebellious coalition of Canaanite vassal states led by the king ...

Emperor Titus

Before becoming Emperor; Titus gained renown as a military commander; serving under his father in Judea during the First Jewish–Roman War.

The Zealots

The Zealots were a political movement in 1st-century Second Temple Judaism that sought to incite the Jews to rebel against the Romans.

The First Jewish Roman War

The First Jewish Roman War (66–73 CE), was the first of three major revolts by the Jews against the Romans. Read all about it in this post!

Siege of Masada

The siege of Masada was one of the final events in the Jewish Roman War occurring on 73 CE on a large hilltop at the Judean Desert, Dead Sea.

Flavius Josephus

Titus Flavius Josephus born as Yosef Ben Matityahu was a first-century Romano-Jewish historian who was born in Jerusalem; then part of Roman Judea; to a father of priestly descent and a ...